Clinician's Corner Blog

A PHCoE blog series written by leaders, clinicians and experts on current topics of interest for psychological health care providers in the Military Health System.

  • Writing and Talking about Mental Health: Do’s and Don’ts to Reduce Stigma May 26, 2020

    Stigma remains a significant barrier to seeking mental health care in the military. While DoD strives to address and reduce stigma through programs and policies, there’s a way that we can all do our part to challenge the stigma associated with mental health – through our words.

  • "Walkabout” to Build Trust, Reduce Stigma January 27, 2020

    The “walkabout” is a hallmark of front-line military psychology. Walkabouts are informal individual or small group health promotion activities initiated by behavioral health providers outside the clinic setting in which at least one principle of psychological wellness is discussed. Walkabouts do not establish formal provider-patient roles and are not documented in the medical record. These activities can be conducted by both credentialed providers and behavioral health technicians.

  • Reducing Military Mental Health Stigma to Improve Treatment Engagement: Guidance for Clinicians July 8, 2019

    Stigma is associated with negative attitudes about psychological health care and poses a significant barrier to seeking help, engaging in care, and completing psychological health treatment.

  • Reducing Self-stigma: Mental Health is as Important as Physical Health June 25, 2018

    One of service members’ most frequently cited barriers to mental health care is stigma, perceived shame or disgrace attached to something regarded as socially unacceptable. Nearly 60 percent of service members who have mental health symptoms do not seek care. While they may readily see a physician if they have a physical ailment, they often do nothing when it comes to their mental health.

  • Words Matter: The Effect of Stigma and Labeling on Mental Health Care in the Military March 19, 2018

    There is a well-known discrepancy between the number of service members with sub-clinical mental health symptoms and those who actually seek care. Research estimates that more than half of service members exhibiting clinically significant mental health symptoms do not seek mental health care.

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The views expressed in Clinician's Corner blogs are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Psychological Health Center of Excellence or Department of Defense.