Clinician's Corner Blog

A PHCoE blog series written by leaders, clinicians and experts on current topics of interest for psychological health care providers in the Military Health System.

  • PTSD Awareness Month 2020: Overview of Evidence-based Practice June 22, 2020

    Each June, the Department of Defense joins the national effort to promote awareness of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a mental health condition that may arise following exposure to a trauma such as combat, a natural disaster, or an assault. Individuals with PTSD experience distressing and intrusive memories of the trauma as well as avoidance, hyperarousal, and negative thoughts and mood.

  • Tactical Naps: When Napping Can Be Good for You May 4, 2020

    One of the hallmarks of sleep hygiene education is the instruction to “avoid taking naps.” The idea is that avoiding naps will help to keep a consistent circadian rhythm and ensure that you feel tired when it’s time to go to bed. However, most of the sleep hygiene instruction that mental health providers give their patients is difficult to implement in combat, deployed, or field training environments.

  • A Quick Start Guide to Written Exposure Therapy: How Can I use it This Week? April 28, 2020 (Updated: May 6, 2020)

    Written exposure therapy, also called written narrative exposure therapy, is a brief trauma-focused treatment for PTSD which may readily be adapted for use during the current telehealth environment.

  • Meeting the Challenge of Co-occurring Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury March 9, 2020

    The evaluation and treatment of patients with co-occurring mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), also called concussion, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be a challenge for mental health care providers. Concussion and PTSD often occur together in military patients because combat-related operations can result in head trauma (physical or physiologic trauma) and psychological trauma–related experiences.

  • Helping Military Teams Manage Acute Stress When It Matters Most January 13, 2020

    Imagine a team of service members in the middle of a fire fight – the explosions, the smells, the flashes of light, the fear. And now imagine that one of them gets so overwhelmed by stress that they freeze. They stop functioning, and now the team is down one service member and maybe two or more, as the team has to treat the affected individual. What do we, as mental health professionals, advise teams to do in a moment like this? What procedures are in place to help address an acute combat stress reaction when it matters most: in the midst of a life-threatening situation?

Pages

All ideas will be considered, but may not be accepted.

The views expressed in Clinician's Corner blogs are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Psychological Health Center of Excellence or Department of Defense.