Clinician's Corner Blog

A PHCoE blog series written by leaders, clinicians and experts on current topics of interest for psychological health care providers in the Military Health System.

  • PTSD Awareness Month 2020: Overview of Evidence-based Practice June 22, 2020

    Each June, the Department of Defense joins the national effort to promote awareness of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a mental health condition that may arise following exposure to a trauma such as combat, a natural disaster, or an assault. Individuals with PTSD experience distressing and intrusive memories of the trauma as well as avoidance, hyperarousal, and negative thoughts and mood.

  • Using a Navy Program to Navigate the Continued Stress and Uncertainty of COVID-19 June 8, 2020

    Continued Stress of COVID-19

    Although we have settled into a new way of life, COVID-19 continues to bring lots of things to worry about, including health concerns and major unwanted life changes. On top of worrying about isolated loved ones and contracting the virus, summer programs for kids have been canceled, getting groceries is challenging, we’re still stuck at home, and many remain concerned about layoffs and financial loss.

  • Connecting to Psychological Health Care Resources During COVID-19 June 1, 2020

    A friendly reminder for the military community: the Psychological Health Resource Center (PHRC) is available to provide information on psychological health, connections to psychological health care, and access to community resources during COVID-19. The COVID-19 pandemic, and its impact on our daily lives and routines, may trigger interpersonal conflicts between family members and friends, increase feelings of anxiety or depression, or cause lost connections with psychological health care providers.

  • New Resources for Assessment and Management of Suicide Risk Toolkit May 29, 2020

    One thing I’ve learned from this Mental Health Awareness Month is that we all #NeedALittleHelp sometimes. During these unprecedented times, many of us are seeking online resources to help us take care of those we love and others under our care. For those who have loved ones or patients struggling with suicidal thoughts and feelings, this may be an especially stressful time when resources and support are needed most.

  • Writing and Talking about Mental Health: Do’s and Don’ts to Reduce Stigma May 26, 2020

    Stigma remains a significant barrier to seeking mental health care in the military. While DoD strives to address and reduce stigma through programs and policies, there’s a way that we can all do our part to challenge the stigma associated with mental health – through our words.

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The views expressed in Clinician's Corner blogs are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Psychological Health Center of Excellence or Department of Defense.