Clinician's Corner Blog

A PHCoE blog series written by leaders, clinicians and experts on current topics of interest for psychological health care providers in the Military Health System.

  • Put Out the Welcome Mat: Tips to Provide Culturally-Sensitive Care to Transgender Service Members June 19, 2017

    A 2015 civilian survey of transgender individuals conducted by the National Center for Transgender Equality found that during the past year, 33 percent of transgender individuals who saw a health care provider had a negative experience related to being transgender. Hopefully you’re reading this blog to learn more about providing culturally-sensitive care as you move towards cultural competence.

  • The Transgender Narrative: Defining a Unique Path June 12, 2017

    The first blog in the LGBT Pride Month series reviewed current DoD policy. This blog will focus on increasing your familiarity with the transgender narrative. As you begin clinical practice with this population, particularly assessment of gender dysphoria, an understanding of the transgender narrative will inform your work. You may want to start by reading this helpful introduction to key transgender terms.

  • Implementing Transgender Behavioral Health Care in the Military June 5, 2017

    In June 2016, a new policy was introduced allowing transgender service members to openly serve in the United States military. This policy creates changes for military mental health providers who are now responsible for new aspects of care with which many providers may have little familiarity.

  • Intro to Data: Using Big Data in the Public Health Sector and the Military Health System June 1, 2017

    Welcome to the second blog in our “Intro to Data” series where we’ll talk about how big data can be used in the health and public health sectors, specifically within the Military Health System (MHS). In our first blog, Dr. Waitsman introduced the 3 Vs that often describe big data: volume, velocity and variety.

     

     

  • Impact of Rank in Psychotherapy May 30, 2017

    Psychotherapy is always a relationship with a power differential (discuss amongst yourselves).

    I think this statement is almost always true. The relationship between doctor and patient places the doctor in the position of “expert” while the patient is seeking assistance – often out of great need, or even desperation. This uneven relationship is further complicated in the Military Health System when military rank is introduced as another variable potentially impacting the relationship. And it can cut both ways.        

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The views expressed in Clinician's Corner blogs are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Psychological Health Center of Excellence or Department of Defense.