Clinician's Corner Blog

A PHCoE blog series written by leaders, clinicians and experts on current topics of interest for psychological health care providers in the Military Health System.

  • Department of Defense Releases Annual Report on Military Suicide July 2, 2018

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has released its annual report on the occurrence of military suicide for calendar year 2016. PHCoE’s DoD Suicide Event Report (DoDSER) team is currently preparing the 2017 report and we’re also collecting information on cases that, unfortunately, have occurred in 2018. 

  • Reducing Self-stigma: Mental Health is as Important as Physical Health June 25, 2018

    One of service members’ most frequently cited barriers to mental health care is stigma, perceived shame or disgrace attached to something regarded as socially unacceptable. Nearly 60 percent of service members who have mental health symptoms do not seek care. While they may readily see a physician if they have a physical ailment, they often do nothing when it comes to their mental health.

  • The Mind, the Body, and Trauma: A Place for Complementary and Integrative Health Practices in the Treatment of PTSD June 18, 2018

    Complementary and integrative health (CIH) practices have gained traction in recent years as ways to support coping in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Broadly, CIH approaches focus on the connection between mind and body, and include practices such as:

  • Treating Post-traumatic Nightmares in the Military: Imagery Rehearsal Therapy June 11, 2018

    Nightmares and PTSD

    Nightmares are one of the hallmark symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), though post-traumatic nightmares may exist independently and do not equate to a diagnosis of PTSD. Post-traumatic nightmares may be described as lengthy, detailed dreams in which the story line evokes intense fear, anxiety or other negative emotions. Many patients report that these nightmares involve trying to avoid or cope with some horrific danger that closely resembles a specific traumatic event.

  • Treating Unresolved Trauma in the Deployed Environment June 4, 2018

    For many, the phrase “deployment trauma” brings to mind images of combat: improvised explosive devices, taking small arms fire, or traumatic amputations and brain injuries. Over the last 10 years, direct exposure to combat during deployments has decreased. Nonetheless, treating trauma in the deployed environment remains an ever present challenge for military mental health practitioners. This blog will discuss why even objectively safe deployments trigger trauma and some questions to ask when considering whether to process trauma in the deployed environment.

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The views expressed in Clinician's Corner blogs are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Psychological Health Center of Excellence or Department of Defense.